The RAKER!

After making a fork jig I needed a way to rake (bend to give the fork offset) fork blades. Joe from Cobra Frames gave me some pointers and pics to help me come up with a design.
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Two pieces of 1.25″ thick x 8″ wide x 1′ long poplar were used to make the die. I traced my curve on the blocks with a friking super accurate set-up!
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Then deck screwed them together and cut the profile.
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Then unscrewed them and belt sanded chamfers on the inner edges to create the “V”.
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I made the roller in the handle out of some scrap low carbon steel and cut the stock for the side plates in no time. Laying out my hole locations in the side plates and die was quick. I then bolted the handle extension on. 50″ of leverage outta be enough to bend some little fork blades.

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I also had to weld the part that stops the tube up.

Next I’ll attach the wooden die to a 6′ long 2×10 and the tool will be complete.


8)

I used a shit load of washers on this thing. LOL!

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Now, I’ll be building myself a disc cyclocross fork because my next project will be a disc cross frame for myself.

Thanks again and ride safe out there!
Allan Varcoe

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Fork Jig

After making my frame jig I figured I’d keep on keepin’ on with the 80/20 stuff and build a fork jig. It’s pretty simple, pretty self explanatory. This jig only took minor machining to build. And the machined parts could have been done without milling, just drilling.

The FixieFool fork is just for demonstration purposes only. I actually rode a fork just like this for a bit and holy CRAP was it stiff. My hands would hurt after 20 miles on that fork. Geez. You definitely get what you pay for when it comes to fork ride quality.

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